Mount Tehama, Gone but not Forgotten

I’ve spent little time in the southern portion of Lassen Volcanic National Park, and on this day (late January 2016) I wanted to immerse myself in a bit of geologic history amidst a winter wonderland.

After 2-3 years of lackluster snow levels, plentiful snow is a welcome sight.

In the winter, the entry fee is $10 per vehicle; a caretaker stays in the parking lot. If you plan to be out later than dark, let him know in advance. You can sleep in your car for $10 or obtain a permit for backcountry camping.

The Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center is open limited days and hours during the winter, while the restrooms and front entry are open 24/7. Be sure to register your trip departure and return.

With an over nine foot base, snow steps are required to access the trails.

One of the easiest ways to explore the park is via the road, which is exactly what I did on this date.

Sulfur Works and Mount Diller

A bubbling mud pot of hydrothermal activity at Sulfur Works.

A fumarole near Sulfur Works.

Up close and personal with a fumarole.

Brokeoff Mountain to the left, followed by the ridge above Ridge Lakes, Mount Diller and Pilot Pinnacle barely visible on the far right. Many people incorrectly assume Brokeoff and Mount Diller formed the edges of what once was Mount Tehama. It’s actually comprised of not only Brokeoff, but also Mount Conard, Pilot Pinnacle, Mount Diller, and Diamond Peak. It was 11-15 miles wide and 11,000′ tall. (As a comparison, Mt Shasta is 16-17 miles wide and over 14,000′ tall).

Diamond Peak, stands at 7,968′.

Brokeoff Mountain rises to 9,235′.

Mount Diller tops out at 9,087′.

Pilot Pinnacle at 8,886′.

Mount Conard (8,204′), is another remnant of Mount Tehama.

Eagle Peak (9,222′) to the left; Lassen Peak (10,457′) to the right.

Lassen Peak and what’s known as Vulcan’s Eye.

Brokeoff Mountain to the left, Diamond Peak and Mount Diller.

 

Jan’s Tips and Resources:

 

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