Me and My CRV – Eats on the Road

Just because you’re traveling doesn’t mean you need to bust your seams or your budget.

This is what I’ve learned.

  1.  Say NO to fast food and mini-markets (unless you don’t care about your weight, health, or budget).

Exceptions:

a. Restroom use

b. Refilling water (just ask, I’ve been charged once, never been told no)

c. Ice (free at some McDonald’s)

2. Say YES to grocery stores and pre-planning

A benefit of having a car is you’ll be driving through at least small towns where you can resupply frequently, especially fresh food. I tend to stock my car before I leave home with non-perishables (i.e. bars, cereal, coffee, nuts, jerky, home dehydrated meals, canned meat, etc.), some semi-perishables (i.e. fruit, veges and tortillas), and the ice chest with perishables (i.e. hard boiled eggs, cheese, salad makings, etc).

While traveling, I usually buy the plastic containers of lettuce so I can easily add other fixings to make a salad, have a container to eat out of and store leftovers in my ice chest. 

Many places now have healthy, reasonably priced, prepared food options, and also have a microwave available for heating or cooking purchased food.

Many tiny towns have great deli’s with options beyond fried food. Dollar General is becoming a frequent presence along many of the backroads. You’ll find Walmart and Safeway in mid-sized towns, plus WinCo and CostCo in larger communities.

When it’s time to replace bars, buy them in boxes vs individually to save money. I buy my nuts in large containers at CostCo. If the local stores don’t carry what you like or need, order from Amazon and have them shipped to a place you plan to stay (i.e. friend or motel). They also have options to ship to a lockbox facility such as a grocery store. Retail mailing stores and UPS stores will hold packages for a fee. I don’t recommend sending Amazon to the USPS General Delivery as there always seems to be confusion since they prefer shipping FedEx or UPS.

When you stay with friends, prepare hard boiled eggs and other foods for the ice chest to give you some variety.

Budget funds for eating out. You’ll want a change. I got bored with my car options, plus you may want internet access. McDonalds has free internet but it’s painfully slow if you want to upload photos. Starbucks has faster internet. Many times library speeds are even better.
Tip: if you plan to visit places with problem bears such as Yosemite, Tahoe, Yellowstone, you’ll be told you can’t park your car with food in it. Usually there is a bear box nearby where you can stash a cooler or a small bin. After having a mouse get in my car in Washington, I recommend storing all food in plastic bins.

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4 thoughts on “Me and My CRV – Eats on the Road

  1. Situation: Mouse in car.

    Symptoms:

    (1) You see mouse looking out at you from behind dashboard. (More likely with older cars having mechanical HVAC controls.)

    (2) You see reverse dimples in headliner caused by mousie feets as it runs around over your head.

    (3) You hear a faint buzzing sound as mouse blows you a raspberry. Followed by tiny gales of wild laughter.

    (4) You hear slight, intermittent scratching noises all night.

    (5) Upholstery begins disintegrating in nest-sized patches.

    Issues: Mouse not only rips up upholstery to make nest, but additionally poops randomly into, onto, beside, on top of, and/or under everything. Mouse demonstrates superior agility and intelligence, eats stuff, makes you feel helpless.

    Possible Solutions:

    (1) Simplest: Take everything valuable out of car. Set car on fire. Buy another car. Guaranteed. (Also fast.)

    (2) Slower but cheaper: Take everything valuable out of car. Take everything else out of car. Remove seats. Set traps. Wait.

    (3) Most appealing: When you see evidence of mouse running around above you inside headliner, slap at it. Slap at it hard. Smash it. Worry about cleanup later, or sell car within 24 hours and leave town. Do not return.

    (4) Prevention: Close vents as soon as car stops moving. This keeps mousies from crawling in through the vents. If leaving car unattended, or planning on parking off-road and going to sleep, then also close windows either completely or so far that you can barely stick the tip of your little finger into the gap. If that. (Mousies are small.) Smartest option. Effective unless mouse has a master key.

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