AZ/NV/CA – Goodbye Cave Creek Canyon . . . COVID-19 Wins

Part of the joy of traveling is town stops. I love hanging out in local libraries, coffee shops and eateries. I enjoy chatting with strangers especially fellow travelers. When places are closed, towns are on lock down, or strangers eye you as one potentially carrying the germ, it’s just not fun. Should I get sick I was three long hours from Tucson, and my California-based insurance was only good for emergencies out of state. When California was ordered to STAY HOME, I was worried about borders closing. All signs said, it was time to face reality. This spring jaunt is over!

I found out later the first COVID-19 case in Cochise County was on 3/20/20, the day I departed. As you can see it’s been growing ever since. My home base of Shasta County is still only declaring 3 cases but since testing is not being done, I don’t have much confidence in this number.

I’d only seen one javelina this visit, at the library of all places. It was on a mission to find treats and not interested in a portrait. Lucky for me on my way to town, after my last night of dispersed camping, I came upon several foraging along the road.

Not nearly as cute as the babies Joan and I saw at the Cave Creek Ranch during our December 2017 visit.

Before beginning my 4-day, 2,000-mile drive home, I took a slight detour through Portal where I found a little happiness in poppies and minions.

I drove Forest Service Road 42 from Portal to near Chiricahua National Monument. There were plenty of opportunities to stop for short hikes leading to potential views. This tree graveyard is a harsh reminder of the 2011 Horseshoe 2 fire. The large swatch of yellow on the valley floor is mustard while the orange is poppies. Many of the high elevation trails are accessible from this road. I look forward to a future visit where I can continue to mark up my map.

My plan was to take a slightly longer way home avoiding major traffic and larger towns. So after filling my tank in Willcox it was back up 191 toward Safford where there is some BLM land available for dispersed camping. The poppies were still blooming and I found a few white ones that had opened. With a light wind, they made for a challenging photo session.

The next morning I retraced my path to Peridot on Highway 70 where I’d found some great floral displays a couple of weeks previous. To my delight the blooms had changed and now included more lupine.

I took a slight detour the this Roosevelt Lake overlook along Highway 188. The area holds special memories from my hike on the Arizona Trail.

I stopped several times trying to capture great views of this peak near Flagstaff, either San Francisco or Humphreys. I finally gave up and accepted this as an adequate memory. This section of the Arizona Trail is still on my list.

As the afternoon progressed it was time to start looking at dispersed camping options. I checked out this one but decided I best skip this muck.

I found a much better option near Kingman.

Shortly after crossing into Nevada the next morning, I found this viewpoint with great lighting over Lake Mead.

I caught some amazing light and a rainbow over Las Vegas, but it’ll have to live in my mind since dashboard photography wouldn’t have done it justice. This was my maiden voyage on 95 through Nevada. The beauty exceeded all expectations. Since I was traveling on a day of precipitation I wasn’t surprised to find snow on a few of the passes.

I stopped at Walker Lake to photograph these Big Horn Sheep.

As I stared at the lake and realized how many hours I’d been driving, I wondered about camping opportunities. Sure enough this is a free BLM campground. Although it was only about 3pm, I was ready for some exercise.

It was a great place to explore while easily practicing social distancing. There were a few other campers but no one else wandering the shoreline.

The fresh coat of snow on Mount Grant made it a standout.

With more stormy weather in the forecast including snow I was hopeful I could make it through Lassen before the snow started piling up. I had about four hours and 300 miles.

I made great time through the snow flurries and was happy to complete my shopping chores by late afternoon. My goal was to get everything I needed to quarantine for 2-3 weeks. After all those stops at gas stations and public restrooms, I felt very germy. There’s only so much you can do with gel and wipes. It’s just not the same as soap and water, plus so easy to recontaminate everything as you touch the steering wheel, gear shifter, keys, phone, etc.

Sure enough chain controls were in place the next morning. I was grateful for my timing.

I felt the stress release as I transitioned from traveling to being safe at home. It was time to clean up the mess.

I heard from my new friends who were camped at the USFS campground near Portal. They were booted a day or two after I departed. More states were issuing closures and stay at home orders. I was confident in my decision to return home.

Cutting my trip short at 25 days and wasting nearly 2,000 miles of time and gas are not my idea of fun. I was prepared to be gone through October. Sometimes you just have to suck it up and realize you can either be a part of the problem or a part of the solution. I choose the latter.

The view from my front window isn’t anything exciting. I know I’ll feel like I’m in jail.

On a positive note, I have green space within walking distance. Spring is in the air, something I haven’t experienced at home since I started traveling 5-6 years ago.

To all my readers, please stay safe and sane. It’s time we prioritize ourselves, our families, neighbors and friends. Hopefully this pandemic will end sooner than later and we can salvage our summer plans. If nothing else this situation should remind everyone tomorrow is not guaranteed. Live without regrets. Stop procrastinating. Sending virtual hugs! Know I’m doing my part by staying at or near home.

Adventure Dates:

  • March 21-24, 2020

Links:

 

AZ – Cave Creek Canyon, Herb Martyr and Snowshed Loop

I don’t like the trail naming system in this area. They have lots of interconnecting trails but you have to research and look up each one to connect. For example if you want to hike Chiricahua Peak and only look up the trail by that name, it would appear to be less than .5 miles in length. For this hike, I started at the Herb Martyr Campground on the Basin Trail aka Herb Martyr Trail which is 3 miles to Snowshed Trail. There are three Snowshed Trails. Snowshed Basin Trail is 2 miles, Snowshed Trail is 8.5 miles and Snowshed Peak Trail is less than a mile. So confusing!

There were three wet feet creek crossings over the three miles required to reach Pine Park. I didn’t take any photos so it must not have been very impressive. My goal was Snowshed Pass.

Pine Park was about 7,800 feet. I like how you can clearly see snow line along these peaks.

Trail conditions were more of a B-C. As you can see in this photo, the tread was quite sloped. There were also a few down trees and overgrowth.

I believe the flat ridge in the distance is Snowshed Pass and my destination. You can see the trail traverses across the front ridge snowfield. The down trees are from the 2011 Horseshoe 2 fire.

I think this might have been a big cat walking the trail ahead of me.

There was plenty of bunny activity.

This section proved to be too much for me. I lost the trail in stickery prickery overgrowth and burned deadfall. If there wasn’t snow and I was a little more motivated I would have fought my way through. It doesn’t look like much but believe me I was all scratched up. There was very little open space to maneuver through the thickets.

So sadly with the pass in the distance I turned around.

Never know what you might find. This is an old telephone line insulator.

Wonder what this sign said?

Rather than retrace my footsteps I took the Snowshed Basin trail on my way back. It was not in nearly as good of shape as the Basin Trail. It was a nice mix of open forest, bushes and grasses.

Sometimes the trail was faint and messy.

I liked the places where the view opened up featuring the colorful rocks.

Such beauty in the colorful rocks.

In some places having maps are helpful.

I found an unexpected trail that runs parallel to Road 42. Just like the other trails I hiked during my time at Cave Creek Canyon, I didn’t see anyone except at the campground.

Adventure Date(s):

  • March 20, 2020

Hike Details:Tips:

  • At the Visitor Center ask for trail guides and the dispersed camping handout.
  • The nearest gas is in Animas, New Mexico
  • The nearest laundry is near Rodeo, New Mexico. I used Rusty’s RV Park and it was clean, inexpensive with the bonus of a place to hang out with WiFi.
  • The nearest shower I found was at The Chiricahua Desert Museum between Portal, Arizona and Rodeo, New Mexico.
  • There are small grocery stores and cafes in both Portal and nearby at Sky Islands.
  • The library and Visitor Center leave on their WiFi during business hours, both accessible from outside.
  • Potable water, garbage and restrooms are available at the nearby campgrounds.
  • Best digital trail maps I found are the Gaia layer on the Gaia app. The others I tried haven’t been updated since the 2011 fire.
  • The time on your phone will flip back and forth between New Mexico and Arizona time, making it very confusing.

Resources:

Links:

I participate in the Amazon affiliate program and may receive a commission on qualifying purchases linked in this post. It doesn’t affect your price but it helps support this site.

 

AZ – Cave Creek Canyon, Silver Peak

I found a great viewpoint dispersed campsite where I had hopes of a great sunset and/or sunrise. Sadly neither happened but I could at least dream of being on top of Silver Peak.

Gusty winds during the night and continuing into the morning had me thinking about other hiking options.

I delayed my decision by hiking the Vista Point Trail.

Evening light was much more spectacular.

My journal notes, “I guess this will be a NO celebration St Patrick’s Day. Gusty winds will limit hiking today. Forget Silver Peak.” Mother Nature had other plans and turned off the wind.

I wonder if these horses are used for trail rides?

You can’t see Silver Peak on the early approach trail. You wrap around the right side of the formation named “The Fingers.”

Soon the grasses will be green but until then the bright pops of color from verbena was a welcome sight.

Beware of the evil ill-placed agave.

After bleeding like a stuck pig, I was happy to find this little water source so I could wash my wound and all the blood. Plus it hurt so that cold water was a nice pain reliever.

After working your way around The Fingers you finally see your objective.

Loved seeing lichen on nearby rocks.

Cool seed pods.

As I gained elevation I found some Alpine Pennycress Wild Candytuft (?) of the mustard family.

It was cool to find it in different stages of bloom.

This a great trail to view the many mountain ranges and get a feel of being on a Sky Island.

At about 4 miles, the real fun begins.

These 51 steps help you gain elevation quickly.

Some had such a tall tread I had to use my hands for assistance.

The foundation of the old lookout marks the end of the official trail. The green ammunition box contains a peak log.

I flipped through the log looking for mine and Joan’s entry when we visited in December 2017 (link). Well I guess the snow explains our missing signatures.

We also missed the survey marker.

The valley floor was covered in yellows of Bladderpod Mustard and oranges of poppies.

If I hadn’t been distracted by COVID-19 worries, I would have continued on to Silver Peak proper.

Silver Peak is the first ridge in this photo.

With cell signal I spent significant time at the top and on the way down consulting with friends and family about the COVID-19 situation. They all encouraged me to stay and hike as it was safer in the wilderness than at home. My stress was beginning to outweigh the joy I usually feel. I wasn’t sleeping well. I was hearing about school closures, empty store shelves, and in general a mix of panic and fear. Having asthma, I’m in one of the groups advised to take extra precautions. The nearby Forest Service Campgrounds were still open, but rules and guidelines were changing quickly. What to do?

Adventure Date(s):

  • March 17, 2020

Hike Details:Tips:

  • At the Visitor Center ask for trail guides and the dispersed camping handout.
  • The nearest gas is in Animas, New Mexico
  • The nearest laundry is near Rodeo, New Mexico. I used Rusty’s RV Park and it was clean, inexpensive with the bonus of a place to hang out with WiFi.
  • The nearest shower I found was at The Chiricahua Desert Museum between Portal, Arizona and Rodeo, New Mexico.
  • There are small grocery stores and cafes in both Portal and nearby at Sky Islands.
  • The library and Visitor Center leave on their WiFi during business hours, both accessible from outside.
  • Potable water, garbage and restrooms are available at the nearby campgrounds.
  • Best digital trail maps I found are the Gaia layer on the Gaia app. The others I tried haven’t been updated since the 2011 fire.
  • The time on your phone will flip back and forth between New Mexico and Arizona time, making it very confusing.

Resources:

Links:

I participate in the Amazon affiliate program and may receive a commission on qualifying purchases linked in this post. It doesn’t affect your price but it helps support this site.

AZ – Cave Creek Canyon, South Fork and Burro Trails

Surprise! My morning started with a stop at the Visitor Center for a little WiFi and a few more trail tips. Within a few minutes of arrival the volunteer received an email shutting down the Visitor Center. My anxiety of being out and about increased. What to do?

Since I was in a remote location and 2,000 miles from home, I decided to hike.

Joan and I hiked this trail in December 2017 (link). I was looking forward to an early spring experience. This area is known as a birder’s paradise. While I was really hoping for a sighting of an Elegant Trogon, I was told they won’t be migrating this direction for a few more weeks. I’d heard there would be a few wet feet crossings so I started in sandals.

Although none of the crossings were deeper than mid-calf nor very swift, I was glad I knew how to pick and choose crossing locations as some were much riskier than others.

With a 30F degree morning, I was glad I waited a bit for those wet feet crossings although the water wasn’t nearly as cold as expected.

The 2014 Hurricane Odile caused major flooding and damage to this trail. You need to pay attention to cairns and trail crossing clues to stay on track. I met a hiker coming the opposite direction who gave me a heads up on one tricky crossing after a long wandering trying to find the trail.

After 8-12 wet feet crossings, it was time to leave my sandals behind and start the climb up the Burro Trail.

After climbing for a while I found this beautiful orange rock escarpment, making an excellent viewpoint and turnaround spot.

Recent rains provided nice potholes for the wildlife.

When hiking in the Chiricahuas, I recommend using the Gaia layer on the Gaia app. It’s the only one that shows current trails. A bonus are the binoculars indicating viewpoints.

This would be a geologist’s Disneyland.

I found a few early blooms including this Hartweg’s Groundsel (?), a member of the aster family.

Alpine Pennycress Wild Candytuft (?), mustard family.

Extra Credit:

You know you’re in the Chiricahua Mountains when you see coatimundi. The previous night on my way to camp I saw this one grubbing away (photo taken through window).

This one wasn’t nearly as cooperative as the ones Joan and I saw at Cave Creek Ranch (photo taken through window).

Adventure Date(s):

  • March 16, 2020

Hike Details:Tips:

  • At the Visitor Center ask for trail guides and the dispersed camping handout.
  • The nearest gas is in Animas, New Mexico
  • The nearest laundry is near Rodeo, New Mexico. I used Rusty’s RV Park and it was clean, inexpensive with the bonus of a place to hang out with WiFi.
  • The nearest shower I found was at The Chiricahua Desert Museum between Portal, Arizona and Rodeo, New Mexico.
  • There are small grocery stores and cafes in both Portal and nearby at Sky Islands.
  • The library and Visitor Center leave on their WiFi during business hours, both accessible from outside.
  • Potable water, garbage and restrooms are available at the nearby campgrounds.
  • Best digital trail maps I found are the Gaia layer on the Gaia app. The others I tried haven’t been updated since the 2011 fire.
  • The time on your phone will flip back and forth between New Mexico and Arizona time, making it very confusing.

Resources:

Links:

I participate in the Amazon affiliate program and may receive a commission on qualifying purchases linked in this post. It doesn’t affect your price but it helps support this site.

AZ – Cave Creek Canyon, Winn Falls and the Basin Trail

Portal is the nearest town to the Cave Creek Canyon area of the Chiricahua Mountains.  With a population of around 800, there are few options to resupply and as of this writing no gas stations. After spending a couple days at the Chiricahua National Monument, I returned to Willcox to resupply and fill my gas tank before finding my way to the other side of the mountain range. There is no easy or fast way to this remote area especially if it’s recently rained, like it had during my visit. This was still early in the COVID-19 scare. I spent time researching and worrying about what to do.

I enjoyed the drive stopping frequently to take photos of the large swaths of yellow, which I believe is Gordon’s bladderpod, a member of a mustard family. An Arizona friend told me these are Bladderpod Mustard.

The white flowers looked very similar although much less prolific. My Arizona friend said these are White Bladderpod.

As I followed signs and google directions to Portal, I wasn’t very happy when I arrived at this obstacle.

I turned around and tried several other roads unsuccessfully. I met a couple of local gals walking who assured me it was fine to drive through. Holding my breath I did!

I stopped at the visitor center and was welcomed with colorful verbena.

The Visitor Center is not only staffed by amazing volunteers, it also offers speedy WiFi and a Verizon booster during office hours. I was happy to find I had a few days of good weather hiking in my future. I purchased the area map, was provided with trail guides, and did some quick research.

COVID-19 fear was low key in the area, although we were all aware and following CDC guidelines. I had plenty of hand sanitizer and antibacterial wipes, and was using both judicially.

I drove to the Herb Martyr Campground Trailhead, enjoying views of Winn Falls enroute. I learned the key for best photos is very early in the morning, around 7-8am due to sun angle and deep canyon walls. I was lucky to find them flowing at this capacity after the rains and snow melt.

The volunteers recommended the Basin Trail as a good option for an afternoon hike. The Horseshoe 2 fire burned over 200,000 acres in 2011. Most of the trails have had to be rebuilt. It’s been an ongoing process with much being in wilderness areas thus mechanized equipment prohibited. Many burned trees are left standing waiting for nature to knock them down. It’s a good reminder of the slow recovery expected at my local park, Whiskeytown National Recreation Area with 97% burned in the 2018 Carr Fire.

I quickly arrived at the Ash Spring area. This chicken coop is all that remains of the homestead built in the 1940’s by Frank Pack, a local miner.

If I’d read my handouts I would have learned that the spring water feeds two pools that have been established to benefit the threatened Chiricahua leopard frog. A few days later I hiked back to the area where I watched as frogs leaped into the ponds but were too shy to let me see or photograph them. I waited and waited and waited for them to reappear but nope not on this day.

The previous blooms on the century plants were like decorations along the trail. Soon this dry grass would be green, but spring had not quite sprung on this mid-March day at 5-6,000 feet. The trails were in great condition, although the short-cut trail to the spring was tougher to find.

The trail offers more views of Winn Falls. But as you can see at 1:30pm the lighting was not the best.

I drove back up the next morning but at 8:30am, but the waterfall was already darkened by a shadow.

Later I hiked the Greenhouse Trail to the Basin Trail in the morning trying to get better views. I found I needed to stay on the Greenhouse Trail which would take me to a high view point. That was on my list for a future hike which sadly didn’t happen this trip.

This is about the best I got on this trip. Winn Falls, I’ll be back!

On this day I hiked the very rocky Greenhouse Trail 4×4 road which reconnects to the Basin Trail.

I was told it would take me to a ridge for 360 views. Sadly the high point was on the shoulder of this hillside. On the left is Silver Peak which I’d hike later in the week; on the right is Mount Sceloporus.

Tip: I found the Gaia layer on the Gaia App was the only one showing the current trails.

There was so much water flowing. Definitely not what you think of when you imagine the dry deserts of Arizona. However, this is one of the sky islands.

“Sky Islands” are isolated mountain ranges in southeastern Arizona and northern Mexico. Some of the mountains rise more than 6,000 feet above the surrounding desert floor making the lowlands and high peaks drastically different. Plants and animals living in the mountains could never survive in the surrounding deserts. Thus by analogy, the mountains are “islands” surrounded by deserts that are “seas”. Source: USFS website

Adventure Date(s):

  • March 15 and 19, 2020

Hike Details:Tips:

  • At the Visitor Center ask for trail guides and the dispersed camping handout.
  • The nearest gas is in Animas, New Mexico
  • The nearest laundry is near Rodeo, New Mexico. I used Rusty’s RV Park and it was clean, inexpensive with the bonus of a place to hang out with WiFi.
  • The nearest shower I found was at The Chiricahua Desert Museum between Portal, Arizona and Rodeo, New Mexico.
  • There are small grocery stores and cafes in both Portal and nearby at Sky Islands.
  • The library and Visitor Center leave on their WiFi during business hours, both accessible from outside.
  • Potable water, garbage and restrooms are available at the nearby campgrounds.
  • Best digital trail maps I found are the Gaia layer on the Gaia app. The others I tried haven’t been updated since the 2011 fire.
  • The time on your phone will flip back and forth between New Mexico and Arizona time, making it very confusing.

Resources:

Links:

I participate in the Amazon affiliate program and may receive a commission on qualifying purchases linked in this post. It doesn’t affect your price but it helps support this site.

AZ – Cochise Stronghold, Cochise Trail

I’m not all that interested in history, but why not learn a bit while hiking in a new area? 

With limited time, Joan (aka Rambling Hemlock) and I selected the Stronghold Divide as our goal for the day. We ended up stopping short of the divide.

The trail started from the East Cochise Stronghold Campground, crossed a small creek and began with a well-signed interpretative trail loop. 

Not far from Chiricahua Monument where we’d hiked the previous couple days, the geology is very similar.

The geology of the Dragoon Mountains caught my eye. 

Halfmoon Tank is a semi-circle shaped dam holding back a pond of water. On this day there was a bit of surface ice. 

Hike Details:

  • Date(s) Hiked: December 22, 2017
  • Mileage (per ViewRanger): 5+ miles
  • Elevation Gain/Loss (per ViewRanger): 1,100’/1,100′
  • Elevation Low/High (per ViewRanger): 4.900’/5,900′
  • Trail Conditions:
    • Tree obstacles: none
    • Overgrowth: none
    • Signage: excellent
    • Terrain: good condition
  • Navigation Skills: minimal
  • Water availability: minimal
  • Camping availability: ?
  • Solitude: we saw only saw a group of 4 this day
  • Bugs: none
  • Wildlife: lots of birds
  • Precip: none
  • Temp: ?
  • LNT: no problems
  • Jan’s Cherry Picker Delight Scale: 3 cherries (out of 5)

Tips:

  • Read the fineprint on the sign board at the campground. It asks that hiker’s register but no fee is required if you have a federal parks pass.

Links:

Resources:

Arizona Trail – Passage 1 – wa-CHOO-kuh The Last Stand

Dates Hiked: March 25-26, 2015 (Days 23-24)
Direction: Southbound
Passage 1: Huachuca Mountains
-Parker Canyon Lake Trailhead to Mexican Border
-Miles: 21.7
-Elevation: Low Point 5,518′, High Point 9,072′ (plus Miller Peak at 9,466′)

Direction of Travel: Right to Left (Southbound)

I’m always amazed at how fast the landscape can change. First photo was taken at 11:11, next at 11:12.

Hello Miller Peak Wilderness.

Our final passage had plenty of good quality natural water sources.

To keep things interesting, more mining relics, including a cistern near Rattlesnake spring.

Not to disappoint, there were a few lupine just beginning to bloom.

It’s always interesting to see where we’ve been. The lake in the photo is Parker Lake, from the previous passage.

We spent the night near a ridge, getting our first views down into Mexico.

I spent my final night on a soft cushy bed of pine needles . . .  This is the life! Note the use of my hiking poles in place of stakes at the ends of my tent. I used this configuration 100% of the time on the AZT, primarily due to rocky or hard-pack ground, making the use of stakes an impossibility. This was one of the reasons I selected this Tarptent Rainbow tent.

With views on the ridge of just another sunset . . . goodnight sun.

Hiking out our final morning was filled with both giddiness and sadness.

We spent the morning watching the valley shadows come alive.

As per usual by now, the blimp continued to be our constant companion, as was the buzz of the drones. FYI, the only evidence we saw of illegals was one pile of debris between Miller Peak and Montezuma Pass. We didn’t see any signs of illegal drug runner activity.

Our last good morning sunrise . . .The trees were aglow with color as the sun made it’s presence known.This rocky passage pulled us forward. Notice my Suntastics 5 Solar Charger, it served me well on the AZT.

Probably the most photographed springs on the Arizona Trail is this one aptly named “Bathtub Spring.” Spring water really was delivered via the spiget. Very creative and cool!

Today’s surprise was learning aspen trees could be found in southern Arizona. I bet this mountain is gorgeous in the fall. 

Joan and I couldn’t resist climbing a few hundred extra feet up Miller Peak (9,466) so we could gaze upon these sweeping views of both the US and Mexico.

Goodbye for now Miller Peak Wilderness.

Looking back at knob of Miller Peak.

Wildflowers weren’t nearly as spectacular, but I was happy to find a few of my friends.

We were so excited to see, if only barely, a Coatimundi. Dru had been telling us about them, Cowgirl and Pete saw them, and now we saw the tail and quickly moving body. Dark brown and beautiful, but too quick for us to photograph or observe for any time. Photo courtesy of the internet.

From Miller Peak, it was all downhill, about 3,000′ in 6.5 miles. It was perfect grade and terrain for me, with my legs wanting to fly to the finish line, but my heart was not quite ready to say goodbye so I paced myself the best I could.

I initially thought the switchbacks in the distance were our trail, but found out it’s the road to Montezuma Pass.

See the US/Mexico border fence?

Next destination – Montezuma Pass

Can you see the trail in the distance?

An example of shared trail signage. For most of our last day, we traveled on the Crest Trail. 

Reaching Montezuma Pass felt monumental, it meant I could drop my pack for the quick two mile hike to the border.

Nothing like giving us a navigational challenge at the end. Why doesn’t the sign include an AZT directional arrow? Why doesn’t it say “to the border?” FYI, Yaqui Ridge Trail is the correct answer.

There’s the monument, within sight, so exciting . . .

The US side of the monument sign.

The Mexico side (yes you have to cross through the barbed wire and live dangerously for a few moments in Mexico).

We were disappointed when we couldn’t locate the monument register. Our detective skills seemed to fail us at the wrong time. Both Joan and I expected the register to be with the monument just like on both ends of the PCT, but alas after much time searching unsuccessfully, we gave up, learning later it resides in the Montezuma Pass informational gazebo.

As they say, all good things must come to an end. It’s been a great adventure. Thanks for following along and being a part of my first long hike. 300 miles, 24 days, I feel accomplished and ready to continue hiking, exploring, and adventuring! I’ll be BACK . . . and hopefully there will be more J&J adventures too.

Sharing the Trail:

Tips and Resources: